Coaches Kyle & Sully: Gettin’ With The Program

kyle-barWith nearly 50 classes to teach between them each week, as well as their own personal training pursuits and lives outside of the gym, you would think coaches Kyle Smith and Mike Sullivan would have a full schedule and little sleep to speak of.  But within the past two weeks Kyle and Sully have begun to tackle your training schedule as well.  Programming for the masses (them asses?) at Crossfit NYC can be a huge challenge, so it made sense to pick the collective brain of our sadists-in-residence, and see what they may have in store for us over the course of the next couple of months.


Could you sum up your general goals with the gym’s programming?

Kyle: To provide the safest, most fun, productive CrossFit training program we possibly can. If that sounds difficult, you’re right! We’re not afraid to learn from our mistakes and achievements, so keep the feedback coming!

Sully: What we have seen in this year’s Open is you need all of the following: strength, the ability to Olympic lift well and a Metcon engine that won’t quit. How does that apply to real life, life-long fitness, and also to those people that aren’t interested in competing in CrossFit or the Open? Simple: our programming applies to most goals. We are starting first with Strength, with three week waves of movements. Currently, we are Back Squatting once a week for three weeks, strict pressing and deadlifting. The next three weeks will be a different squat, press and lift/posterior chain. There is a snatch day and clean day for skill/strength and an Olympic movement in a Metcon. Which gives us a Metcon/Cardio/Respiratory every day…different lengths depending on the day.

You’re programming workouts for 1500 people.  Some of us are very strong but have limited capacity, and others have tremendous endurance but are very limited strength-wise under the barbell.  With everyone trying work toward the middle of that spectrum, how do you come up with a program that helps everyone get there?

Kyle: We write logical strength pieces and smart conditioning workouts- athletes go heavy, then go hard, respectively. As programmers, we know that every workout isn’t perfect for every athlete, and as an athlete you have to be aware that every aspect of your fitness won’t get better all the time.

Sully: The balance of what I have outlined above should produce the middle spectrum results.

For the past few months we’ve seen some movements that are uncommon in Crossfit, like Bulgarian Split Squats, kettlebell pulses, and the elusive contralateral jump & touch.  Should we expect to see more of these unique types of movements?

Kyle: Some of these exercises may make an appearance.  They make you stronger and keep you healthy.

Sully: The beauty of CrossFit is that we have hundreds of movements that we use, so the Bulgarian Split Squat isn’t uncommon to CrossFit– it’s just something that our box hasn’t used much. You will occasionally see some unique movements coming up.sully-stone

When the gym was following main site Crossfit programming, we would see some days where the only WOD was “Deadlift 1-1-1-1-1-1-1” or a similar focus on one strength movement for the whole hour.  Would it be wasteful to bring days like this into the rotation again, even occasionally given our typical format of strength/metcon?

Kyle: You’re likely to see some days that are more strength oriented, some that are more conditioning. But for the most part, it’ll be a combination of both.

Sully: Main site is a great guideline. We have time to do strength and a Metcon in an hour class and our Metcons compliment our strength work, like accessory work. It’s effective and a great use of time.

Kyle your personal focus leans toward olympic lifting.  Talk about the difference between snatches and cleans in a metcon, vs snatches and cleans as an isolated strength movement.  Which athletes and/or coaches inspire you the most in olympic lifting, and why?

I encourage every oly lift done in isolation to be as pitch perfect as possible. These movement patterns will carry over better into conditioning workouts. The one thing I’ll point out in regards to the oly lifts in a conditioning workout- make sure you’re getting back into a good starting position, safely. If you get your hips back into position (low) for a good looking clean, you’ll have more comfortable, efficient cleans for the rest of the WOD. Use conditioning workouts to reinforce good movement- you’ll feel better and be more productive for it.

Athletes that inspire me are the baby with perfect squat form and whichever student I last heard say, “Holy shit, that’s what a snatch is supposed to feel like!”

Sully you seem to work a lot on strength, with an emphasis on Westside Barbell training and strongman.  Talk about how this type of training has helped you as an athlete, and which of your favorite strength movements will be making it into the rotation most often (and why).

I have seen large strength gains from following the Westside programming and I find the Strongman movements really fun. Constantly varied is a large part of both.  So following the three week waves of squatting, pressing and deadlifting will appear and the varied reps, weights and different squats, presses and styles of deadlifts will show up. Remember that all of the strength programming will be scalable also, so newer members shouldn’t be worried.

Coach Kyle teaches weekday mornings at 26th St. and early afternoons at 28th St.  Check the schedule for details.  He can be reached via email at kyle@crossfitnyc.com.

Coach Sully teaches afternoons at 28th St. and evenings at 26th St.  Check the schedule for details.  He can be reached via email at sully@crossfitnyc.com.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=28117557 Nicole Phillips

    Programming has been great recently- thanks Sully and Kyle!!

  • http://twitter.com/RobbieVogler Robbie Vogler

    Coming from a different gym, I have loved the programming since I have been here. Pushes me and works on my strengths and weaknesses every single day! It is only going to get better! Great Job to Kyle and Sully

  • Anthony

    The WOD’s you guys have put together are pure genius! I leave the box feeling energized, sore and accomplished. Great mix of strength, metcon and more abs (core) work than usual–love it. The only problem is picking a day to rest—WOD’s are too cool to skip…Thanks Kyle and Sully

  • Curious

    Sully, What federation do you compete in? Single or multi? PBs? Who has coached you?

  • Pierre

    Huge fan of the current programming.

  • Andrew

    Is there a way to get any info on which days are going to be lifting days as we do the squat, press and lift/posterior chain cycle? A big goal of mine is to get stronger in my squats and I don’t want to miss a squat day.

    The only drawback I’ve seen with NYC vs other boxes I’ve worked out at is structured rest days. The other boxes will have scheduled rest days/make-up days, so if you take a rest, you can stay with the strength cycle (impossible with a box this size). I’ve found it hard here to plan rest days without missing a strength portion, only to have the day after the rest day be something like practicing hand stand walks vs a strength portion.

    • Hari Singh

      The programming handles this problem better than you may realize. Assume, for the sake of argument that squats show up 20% of the time. (Not saying this is correct, just using 20% as an illustration. You could use 15% or 25% and get to the same conclusion I am heading towards).

      If we program seven days per week and you show up randomly on any three, four, or five days (i.e., don’t cherry pick), you will get squats about 20% of the time. If, over a year, you show up 250 times, statistically, you will get squats 50 times. If you show up 200 times, you will get squats 40 times.

      What you are proposing, is that if over the year, we program squats 20% of the 365 days, you want to be able to get squats up to 73 times. This is probably a bad idea, since you are not going to show up 365 times. More likely, you are going to show up 180 times, and squat 40% of the time. That’s not CrossFit.

      The other problem with planned rest days is that they don’t coincide with most people’s schedule. If we made, say, Wednesday and Sunday the Rest / Make-up days, that would screw anyone who wanted to work out with different rest days. We would end up with a situation where people were constantly hoping to make up WOD’s they missed. The cohesion of the facility would fall apart.

      We have tried every scenario you can think of over the years. The best program for everyone is to show up three to five times per week and do the WOD. The programming is statistically distributed across the days of the week, so that you will get an appropriate balance.

    • http://twitter.com/kjs_37 Kyle J Smith

      Unfortunately we can’t release the programming too far ahead of time as that provides more headaches for everyone. Also, make sure you have reasonable expectations for strength gains. You are doing a general physical preparedness program (roughly “CrossFit with a strength bias” but I don’t want to argue over verbiage,) so you will not see the strength gains you could expect if you were doing a strength-only program. Expect to get much stronger as a beginner, then these gains to come slower as you develop..

  • joe

    I’m glad you guys finally addressed the programming. As an 8-year crossfitter, 5 year black box member, 3 time cert attendee, recruiter of 10 people to CFNYC, I have to say that I am not a fan of the programming. For the following reasons:

    1) Intensity

    Doing “2” workouts a day means that I personally have to do them each at
    80%. Lately I’ve been skipping either part A or part B and I usually leave much more wiped out after giving 100% to one of them only. You may be a 24 year old Marine that gets 11 hours of sleep, or a beginner that hasn’t ramped up intensity yet and have see it differently, but personally some of the most destroyed I’ve been have been after 7×1 max deadlifts, or (obviously) Fran – and that’s it. Doing 5 sets of front squats first I think makes for worse results.

    2) Instruction

    We used to spend half the class learning the movements. Now, between drawn out warm-ups, part A’s, part A2’s, part B’s, etc… pretty much the entire hour is spent doing the wod. Cursory instruction does happen, and some coaches emphasize it more, but it is much less than it used to be and shows.

    3) Fun Level

    This is obviously very subjective, but we are all busy and have competing obligations, and some days making the gym is a close call. When I see “Eva” or “Scotts Mom” or whatever I get excited and force myself to go. When I see a complicated A1,A2,B partner/pulse/lateral macchiato 2-paragraph science project WOD, often I decide to finish what I’m doing at work instead.

    4) Constantly Varied

    I know you guys have a method behind your madness, but when I see KB-pulses come up 9 times in 8 days, it makes it feel like the constantly varied aspect of crossfit is being subjugated to something else without evidence or explanation.

    5) Fake Customization

    I don’t think main-site is perfect for everyone, but I still think it’s the best general purpose program. And for a gym with 1500 members, many of whom are beginners, I think the best bet is to focus on the fundamentals, consistency, and then intensity. To the extent that people have weaknesses that need to be worked on, they should make it their own responsibility because it needs to be customized to them. You can’t customize a supplemental program for 1500 people. That’s basically the same as saying crossfit (mainsite) is an inadequate program.

    This is my personal opinion based on what works for me and many years of cf experience, so your mileage may vary.

    • http://twitter.com/kjs_37 Kyle J Smith

      Excellent points, too much to handle in one reply, let’s chat in person. Email me at kyle@crossfitnyc.com and we will set up a date.

      • joe

        Kyle, respectfully I don’t see a reason to chat unless you need more specific feedback. We obviously have different conceptions of good programming. And/or management has alternate considerations being taken into account (marketing, staffing, etc) that doesn’t go in to my calculus. Or I could just be totally wrong. I’m fine with that, and like I said earlier, eventually everyone has to be responsible for themselves, which I will do between my home gym and what I can skip/scale/sub/modify in your programming.

        • http://twitter.com/kjs_37 Kyle J Smith

          10-4 good buddy.

      • katie

        Kyle, would it be possible to take a stab at a few pubic responses when you have time. I think a lot of us would love to read your opinion of the above. Thanks!

        • http://twitter.com/kjs_37 Kyle J Smith

          Look forward to a post in the next week :)

    • EC Crossfitter

      I’ve been doing CrossFit since before the first CrossFit Games and have also recruited several people to CrossFit NYC. I have to agree with Joe here. In addition to his points, I’d add at least one more:

      6) Simplicity and Scorability

      I vastly prefer simple workout structures that have simple scores. When I first started CrossFit seeing my progress when workouts were repeated was a MASSIVE motivation boost. When you program complicated workouts that don’t have simple unambiguous scores, you lose this. Take for instance tomorrow’s part B:

      “EMOM for 5 minutes: 3 power cleans 135 (105)/95 (65) then for the remainder of the minute AMRAP push ups, rest 5 minutes, EMOM for 5 minutes: 2 power cleans 135 (105)/95 (65) then for the remainder of the minute AMRAP burpees”

      There’s no obvious score for this workout because the goals are conflicting. If I slack off in the AMRAP push-up part, I’ll probably be able to get more total rounds. If I bust my ass on the push-ups I’ll probably end up getting fewer rounds. This means that I can’t easily compare different performances. Another example is April 5′s B:

      “30 min amrap: 15 unbroken shoulder to overhead, 15 unbroken DUs/30 unbroken SUs, 60 sec. plank hold”

      The unbroken caveat makes it so you won’t know exactly how much work you did unless you’re really experienced and never fail. Also, the plank hold is hard to measure and introduces a contradictory incentive. You can slack off and not do quite 60 seconds and you’ll get a higher score, but one that can’t be compared with other performances.

      I found that there were a significant number of workouts that I didn’t even bother to log because the workout structure was either too complex or it didn’t have a simple score. This is sad because when I go back through my workout history, I don’t know how often I really worked out and can’t do an arbitrary workout again to see how much I’ve improved. I say stick with the time-tested staples of “for time”, “AMRAP”, “max weight”, and “tabata” and use simple round structures. Every time you program an unscorable or complicated workout you are throwing away data points that your clients could be recording and using for motivation.

      • http://twitter.com/kjs_37 Kyle J Smith

        I’ll tackle the unbroken sets in a different post, but to make sure we’re clear on today’s workout… score is total push ups + total burpees. Everyone does the same number of rounds, so slacking is not an option. I’ll do my best to include “score is…” in all future workouts, as I agree this is an important aspect of CrossFit training. Let me know if you have other questions.

        • Dave B

          The staple workouts are of course great (Fran, Grace, Cindy among them), but I have also enjoyed creativity many of theworks outs since Jason and now Kyle and Sully took over (not all but no body is perfect). I guess I am at a point in my workout life that I know if I got a good work out and I also know if I have worked hard or not and don’t need a time or number of rounds to tell me that every time (yes at times very important but not always). If I am lying on the floor in a pool of my own sweat, then a good work out was had, if I was able to lift weights that I was not able to do before in a similar metcon/Amrap, then a good workout was had. I like the mix, staple workouts along with the different ones. Not all workouts need to be benchmarking workouts. Crossfit has plenty of those and Kyle and Sully will make sure they continue to make the rounds….

          • EC Crossfitter

            I’m not saying we should stick to staple workouts. I’m saying we should stick to staple workout formats. I love creativity, and I actually don’t like it when programming contains mostly named workouts. There’s plenty of room for creative workouts while sticking to the staple workout formats.

        • EC Crossfitter

          Yeah, I mis-read today’s workout. See my response to reisbaron above.

          I’m aware that there is reasoning behind unbroken set workouts, and I think I know what it is. But I think there are ways to achieve that goal without creating conflicting incentives. For instance, just do a tabata where the score is total reps. Or you could insert some prescribed rest like in Barbara.

          Also, it’s not sufficient to just say “score is…”. If today’s workout had been the EMOM as long as you are able that I thought it was, you could have the very simple “score is number of rounds completed”. But that number would not be very meaningful because the workout would contain conflicting goals.

          Some of what I am talking about can be traced to individual movements rather than overall workout structure. The one that sticks out in my mind right now is hollow rocks. I think hollow rocks are a fantastic core exercise, but they suck when used in timed workouts as a prescribed number of reps. They suck not because they’re easy or hard, but because they are not very measurable. If you go really fast doing rather sketchy hollow rocks, it’s much easier than even slightly slower. And if I really decide to crush my core by taking my time on them, then my overall time for the workout really suffers. Plain sit-ups are much better because they get harder the faster I go.

          I think this point applies to all static hold movements. They can be fantastic tools. But I don’t think they should be used in a for-time workout because it creates conflicting incentives. If you really want to use them, put them in as a separate cash-out or something.

      • reisbaron

        I completely respect your preference for simple WODs, but I would say out of the people who record every workout, the number of folks who refuse to enter a result because of a WOD’s complexity are in the minority. This is especially true of the people using Beyond the Whiteboard, as the WODs are already created in the system, so you literally just have to plug in the numbers, whether it’s an EMOM/AMRAP combo or something simple like a Fran time.

        Fight Gone Bad is as classic as a Crossfit WOD gets, and for me the hardest part of the WOD is keeping score, but I don’t refuse to record it because of that inconvenience. The EMOM example you give above is a fixed number of rounds, so slacking off on pushups only gives you a lesser number of pushups. It doesn’t increase the amount of rounds, (which is five, even if you did zero pushups).

        The “time-tested staples” mentioned above represent the majority of the WOD calendar anyway, and while we do see less “simplicity” from time to time, it’s still Crossfit programming, just a new and different approach. That said, see you tomorrow for the 21-15-9 ;-) ?

        • EC Crossfitter

          In general you’re right that BtWB lowers the threshold for logging. But even with it, my point still stands. There have been a significant number of workouts that BtWB couldn’t even log adequately. The ones that stick in my mind are strength workouts with some kind of a complex with multiple variations of a movement. And even if BtWB didn’t have any shortcomings, there are still a number of workouts where the “score” contains conflicting goals and is pretty much meaningless.

          FGB is more difficult to score, but I still consider it to be a simple workout because there is a single unconflicted goal: more reps.

          You’re right about the EMOM tomorrow. I was thinking of EMOM as long as you are able. In that case my point does apply.

          • reisbaron

            The two main reasons I see for a “score” in WODs are 1> to measure your performance against others and 2> to measure your performance against yourself over time. But it’s getting a bit micro to say that “scorability” is something that influences whether or not you do a workout, or whether or not you record it. At that point you’re letting data points get in the way of life experience.

            Sometimes it’s healthy to throw away the notepad and pay attention entirely to how you feel. If the score of a WOD is meaningless to you, there are plenty of other ways to take the same WOD and make it a catalyst for personal improvement. After all, if a person does two Frans and completes them both in 3 minutes flat, they are not identical experiences…different amounts of work were done (how high above the bar was your chin each time?), and the person felt different each time. So considering this, should a score ever be more than a general reference of work and/or progress?

          • Dave B

            You are a wise a man Mr. Baron.

          • EC Crossfitter

            I think there’s a third reason for a clear unambiguous score: motivation. Yes, you should be able to motivate yourself without the benefit of a score, but I think that having a score creates a very tangible extra little push. And I think it’s one of the key things that distinguishes CrossFit from other fitness methodologies.

            I did CrossFit by myself at home religiously for several months before the first gym opened up in my town, so I’m clearly not lacking intrinsic motivation. But I’ve noticed myself tending to slack off a bit on workouts where I either wasn’t keeping track of my score due to a more complicated workout structure or because I felt like sacrificing one component of a conflicting score in favor of the other component. Now, you could just lay all the blame on me and say that I should have been more conscientious. But I think that’s ignoring the reality that we’re all human and will inevitably have off days. So why not take advantage of every motivational factor available to us?

            I think the value of a score in motivation is roughly analogous to the value of competition in motivation. You might argue that one shouldn’t need someone competing next to them to add motivation. But just because it’s possible to get good results by ourselves at home doesn’t mean that we should ignore the value of competition that groups bring. I think the same is true of simple consistent scores.

    • http://www.facebook.com/jason.lapadula Jason Lapadula

      Since you involved me in the conversation, I figured I would address some of your comments:
      1) As an experienced crossfitter, you should know that you can’t go 100% intensity all the time unless you are a beginner. Plain and simple, training and testing are two different things – testing is the only time you should go 100%. If you still feel crushed or need to take your time with your lifts, I know a majority of the coaches (including me) will let you take longer with your lifts. You should remember the phrase “infinite scalability” – scale to your needs. By the way, I’m 22 and get 7-8 hours of sleep, and I’m sure those two facts alone are why I can train more – hard work has nothing to do with it.

      2) Instruction now is actually much better (in my opinion) than it was a few years ago. It will never be perfect, and there will always be new faces that require additional instruction. If you need any additional instruction or cueing on movements, I’m sure any coach will help you if you ask. You can also set up a private session with the coach of your choice to go over specific movements.

      • joe

        I wasn’t referring to you specifically, I was using that description as a proxy for a young, healthy, strong, dude/gal who takes care of themself. It’s easier for someone like that to do two workouts a day well, than someone like me who is 37, coming off injury, and spends 60 hrs a week at a desk.

        That being said, I stand by all of my points — though I did say that everyone’s mileage may vary on a given programming style.

        Just to clarify, in terms of 100% intensity, I’m not saying you have to do high power output every day, or go for a PR every day, and I believe in back off weeks, rest days, and active recovery days. My only point is that there is a big difference between a 1) 7×1 1RM wod, 2) a hard metcon only wod, and 3) a 60 min cornucopia of strength, prehab, and metcon wod. I think good programming would do all of the above. You can’t do #3 almost every day and expect to get the same intensity on all the separate components of it than you would on #1 or #2 day alone. At least I can’t. I think the current programming leads to generally lower intensity (on more things) across more narrow time and modal domains (longer combined workouts).

    • http://www.facebook.com/jason.lapadula Jason Lapadula

      3) I will never understand this, so I cant really talk about the fun factor of these workouts. If you want to have fun go outside, play a pickup game of football, or run in the park. Training is for a specific goal.

      4) I assume you are talking about the strength work because the conditioning workouts have been pretty varied. Constant variation (for a strength program) works for a beginner, but a progressive strength program will work faster (not an opinion but a fact). This is why every lifting protocol is progressive and not a random number of sets, reps, and percentages. And kb pulses as well as split squats came up once every 8 days, to get people out of the sagital plane. Most people that come are not currently playing a sport and do not move very much laterally anymore (or rotationally), a key component to balanced fitness that a lot of people forget.

    • http://www.facebook.com/jason.lapadula Jason Lapadula

      5) Not 100% clear on what you’re saying, can you please give an example? I agree that fundamentals and consistency come before intensity, but I’m not sure what you mean by “fake customization”. We have a strength portion and a conditioning portion in most of the wods because that is what the majority of us have found to be effective (not crushing workouts like Eva and Scott’s Mom). Not to say that other methods are ineffective, but this is what most of us have found to be a simple, quick, and sustainable way to make people better.

  • joe

    I’m glad you guys finally addressed the programming. As an 8-year crossfitter, 5 year black box member, 3 time cert attendee, recruiter of 10 people to CFNYC, I have to say that I am not a fan of the programming. For the following reasons:

    1) Intensity

    Doing “2” workouts a day means that I personally have to do them each at
    80%. Lately I’ve been skipping either part A or part B and I usually leave much more wiped out after giving 100% to one of them only. You may be a 24 year old Marine that gets 11 hours of sleep, or a beginner that hasn’t ramped up intensity yet and have see it differently, but personally some of the most destroyed I’ve been have been after 7×1 max deadlifts, or (obviously) Fran – and that’s it. Doing 5 sets of front squats first I think makes for worse results.

    2) Instruction

    We used to spend half the class learning the movements. Now, between drawn out warm-ups, part A’s, part A2’s, part B’s, etc… pretty much the entire hour is spent doing the wod. Cursory instruction does happen, and some coaches emphasize it more, but it is much less than it used to be and shows.

    3) Fun Level

    This is obviously very subjective, but we are all busy and have competing obligations, and some days making the gym is a close call. When I see “Eva” or “Scotts Mom” or whatever I get excited and force myself to go. When I see a complicated A1,A2,B partner/pulse/lateral macchiato 2-paragraph science project WOD, often I decide to finish what I’m doing at work instead.

    4) Constantly Varied

    I know you guys have a method behind your madness, but when I see KB-pulses come up 9 times in 8 days, it makes it feel like the constantly varied aspect of crossfit is being subjugated to something else without evidence or explanation.

    5) Fake Customization

    I don’t think main-site is perfect for everyone, but I still think it’s the best general purpose program. And for a gym with 1500 members, many of whom are beginners, I think the best bet is to focus on the fundamentals, consistency, and then intensity. To the extent that people have weaknesses that need to be worked on, they should make it their own responsibility because it needs to be customized to them. You can’t customize a supplemental program for 1500 people. That’s basically the same as saying crossfit (mainsite) is an inadequate program.

    This is my personal opinion based on what works for me and many years of cf experience, so your mileage may vary.

  • CollinD

    Question: Was thinking about investing in a pair of weightlifting shoes (maybe Adidas Adipower). Given new programming, do you recommend investing in weightlifting shoes?

    • http://twitter.com/kjs_37 Kyle J Smith

      Absolutely! While I haven’t seen you squat, I know that weightlifting shoes help most people to optimize ankle mobility. As to what brand, it seems they’re all great. Once folks get weightlifting shoes they never worry about the brand any longer, they’re just glad they have them.

      • CollinD

        Thanks Kyle

  • CollinD

    Question: Was thinking about investing in a pair of weightlifting shoes (maybe Adidas Adipower). Given new programming, do you recommend investing in weightlifting shoes?

  • http://www.facebook.com/hilores Amber Rodriguez

    Thanks for writing this up, Reis. And thanks to Kyle & Sully for giving us a peek at the thought process(es) that go into our programming. Really interesting read.

    I’m coming up on 1 year at our box (and CrossFit in general), and since I started, I’m consistently surprised at the new things I can do, how much heavier my lifts and squats are getting, and where I am now as opposed to a year ago. I’ve found that CrossFit’s innate nature is getting me better/faster/stronger at a bunch of shit, and for that, I’m more than satisfied.

    But major kudos to Kyle & Sully for striking that balance that so many of us had been screaming for: “fun” and “challenging.” I’m having the same issue as Anthony – I’ve wanted to take a stab at every WOD that’s come up recently, so I’m actually arguing with myself over my rest! Pleasant change! :D

    Looking forward to more!

  • Jana B.

    I have to echo a lot of what other people have said. I am loving the programming you guys are putting together. Awesome job.

  • Ali

    I would also agree that programming has been awesome lately. Thanks guys!

  • http://www.facebook.com/adam.green.9655 Adam Green

    I’m a beginner (did Elements in January), and, for me, the programming is superb: varied, fun, challenging–and, so far, effective. I genuinely feel bummed when I have to take a rest day or can’t get to the box (unless OH squats are involved, in which case I have to force myself to show up). My personal goal is pretty simple–GPP for everyday life and the sports I do (karate, surfing), and the programming seems to be accomplishing that.

  • http://www.facebook.com/simon.jelk Simon JElk

    Current programming is awesome, in my opinion. I love the emphasis on strength, while at the same time mixing in metcons that are longer than 4 minutes long. People need to recognize that programming for so many people is difficult.

    As to the posts regarding creativity, I fail to understand why a “creative workout in a non-traditional format” is an issue? Beyond the Whiteboard is complex enough that almost all “creative” workouts can be logged. Keep the creativity coming!

  • Dee C

    we need snatching and squating 2 times a week please